Monday, March 4, 2013

Glazing Tutorial

Glazing is one of those techniques that is very easy but can be super intimidating {even for experienced DIYers}.  Well, sweet readers, I hope to give you a confidence boost today with this easy-peasy glazing tutorial.  Let me start by showing you why you want to glaze in the first place…



See how those details pop?  Now you can accomplish the same look by applying dark wax, BUT you are limited to one color…dark brown.  If you’ve been reading for a while then you know I like options.  Take this settee, for example.  It has been reupholstered in a medium gray velvet and the wood frame has been painted white.  


settee-before arm
I know…boring.  Those gorgeous details are hidden and the fresh paint just doesn’t fit the age of the piece.  The dark brown wax wouldn’t compliment the cool tones of the fabric so I decided to custom mix a glaze with dark gray/black tones.  Here’s what I did: 

You’ll need:
  • Martha Stewart Tintable Antique Effect
  • dark gray acrylic craft paint (any brand)
  • black acrylic craft paint (any brand)
  • mixing cup
  • cheap chip brush
  • bowl of water
  • clean cotton rags (I cut up old t-shirts)

settee-paint    settee-supplies

1. Start by mixing your glaze.  {For all you fellow type-As, there are no precise measurements needed.}  I started with a few tablespoons of Antique Effect in my cup.  I then added several drops of both gray and black craft paints.  Add a little at a time, stir thoroughly and then add more as needed until you reach your desired color.  Notice that my small cup was only half-filled with the glaze mixture and it was more than enough to cover the entire settee.  A little goes a long way.

2. Now it is time to apply the glaze.  Dip your brush into the glaze then blot off any excess glaze onto a paper towel or rag.  Working in small sections, brush the glaze onto your piece.  Be sure to work the glaze into all the details.  {If your piece is upholstered like mine, be gentle.  The glaze is watery and you don’t want to splatter glaze onto your pretty fabric!}

settee-paint on
3. With a damp rag {wring it out well}, use long strokes to wipe the glaze off.  Keep folding to a clean section between wipes.  Continue wiping until you reach your desired look.

settee-arm wipe
4.  Continue repeating steps 2 and 3 until the entire piece is complete.  Be sure to rinse your rag thoroughly before starting a new section. 

5.  Seal your piece as you normally would.  I prefer paste wax and applied 2 coats followed by light buffing.

Look what a difference a little glaze can make…

settee-before arm

settee-arm after

settee-before top

settee-top after

settee-whole after
Do you have a go-to glazing recipe?  Feel free to share…

33 comments:

  1. Anonymous3/04/2013

    spectacular!

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  2. Anonymous3/04/2013

    Love this!

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  3. This is wonderful! Thanks for sharring!

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  4. Anonymous3/05/2013

    I painted a French Provencial night stand cream on Saturday, and the details just didn't show up. I had never glazed before but decided to try. Just bought a bottle of premixed glaze from Lowes, brushed it on, and wiped most of it off with a damp rag--just leaving the glaze in the crevices and cracks. Turned out simply amazing. Super easy! But what do you use as a topcoat? I used clear wax, but simply cannot get the hang of it--I keep having spots that look hazy/filmy no matter how much I buff. Do you think the glaze itself provides any protection. Ever use poly on these pieces? I need another way to topcoat besides the wax!!

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    1. I seal 95% of my pieces with wax so I am very comfortable working with it at this point. However, I do understand that it can be frustrating. I would suggest Minwax Polycrylic or CeCe Caldwell's Satin Finish topcoat as an alternative. Minwax also makes a wipe-on poly that is very user friendly (just don't use it over whites because it can yellow them).

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  5. Oh wow! that is absolutley beautiful. Glazing is something I have yet to try. Just havent found the right piece yet I guess.... Thanks!

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  6. Cindy
    Thanks for the great tutorial! I've pinned it. I've been wanting to try glazing but can't find an ASCP retailer in my area - but we do have Martha Stewart paint!
    I found you today thru the Linky Party at Someday Crafts, where I'm #131. I hope you get a chance to stop by my blog and leave a comment, too!
    ~ Megin of VMG206

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  7. This settee is gorgeous! Glazing achieves the look I want & your tutorial explains exactly how to get it. We also like to use paste wax- it provides nice coverage and finish. Thank you for sharing the formula & step-by-step instructions.

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  8. Anonymous3/07/2013

    I have tried to glaze over ASCP before and it seems to soak right in. Is the white chalk paint? If sp, how do you keep it from soaking in? Do you clear wax first? Thanks for the help!

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    1. stephanie3/08/2013

      ooo, good question! I'd be curious to know the answer too ... do you paint, do a coat of wax, then the glaze and then the sealer of wax? Hmmm ... :)

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    2. Yes, if I use chalk paint then I clear wax, glaze, clear wax again. If I use latex then I glaze and follow with wax.

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  9. That piece looks absolutely amazing. Thanks for the glazing tips. I love all your projects. I hope you don't mind. I nominated you for a Liebster award.

    http://www.colorsmixedtogether.com/2013/03/so-honored-liebster-award.html

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  10. Hi Cindy I nominated you for the Liebster Award. Click on my link to get the details:

    http://littlebrags.blogspot.com/2013/03/nominated-for-liebster-award.html

    Greetings Christine

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  11. I'm so glad you've done this tutorial! I've seen lots of glazing tutorials- but the rest are all done with products I can't get in local stores where I live in Canada. I'd found the Martha Stewart glaze at Michael's and was planning to get some. Thank you so much for taking the guess work out of it for me. I have some awesome french provincial chairs I've painted that are just waiting for glaze. :)

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  12. Hi Becky - I thought you would be happy to know that Behr makes a latex glaze (available in a quart/litre) that you can pick up at Home Depot in Canada. I have used it for years and it works great with any paint!! Good luck and Cheers! Michelle

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  13. Just a little tip, you can mix clear wax with a little bit of paint and make a different colored wax. It gives you a lot of options and has the same effect as a dark wax or glaze.

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  14. Thought I read somewhere about mixing clear wax with a little liquid Old English (the dark stuff). Would this make a good glaze? Or should I buy a real glaze like the Martha Stewart product?

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    Replies
    1. Honestly, I don't know. I do use stains to antique pieces but have only mixed paint with the glazing medium.

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  15. Do you glaze before wax ?

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  16. Anonymous10/30/2013

    Can I use chalk paint, glaze and then Minwax poly? Someone said something about the poly soaking into the chalk paint...will that happen if I don't use wax before the poly?

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  17. Anonymous11/04/2013

    I used Primer red on a buffet, what color glaze would look good on this? I was wondering if I should use black? Thank you for this wonderful blog! I learned a lot of useful tips from it

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  18. prose82612/01/2013

    I've just chalk painted a dining table with ASCP in Duck Egg Blue and after waxing, it's blah.
    I was thinking I was really done for since I had already waxed it. Now I'm going to jump in with some Martha Stewart glaze and see what happens. Thanks for making me realize there's hope after waxing.

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  19. I just painted a couple of nightstands with homemade chalk paint in a weathered wood color and I am wondering what to put on them before I glaze? Is it a polycrylic I need to buy or a wax? I have never painted or glazed any furniture before. The nightstands are very old and detailed and I want to glaze them to show all the detail. But unsure of what to use in between the 2??

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  20. Anonymous3/24/2014

    Do you have to seal or put some type of topcoat on after youre done glazing? ive never done it before and im considering painting and glazing my headboard.

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  21. Kate pm9/27/2014

    Beautiful!

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  22. Thanks for sharing this glazing tutorial. Really love to read this review. Would like to see some other posts on the same subject! :)

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  23. Absolutely fabulous change!! You did such a great job!!

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  25. Anonymous12/27/2016

    Cindy, I have a sofa similar to your settee, but have always been terrified of touching it!!! Your tutorial and photos have helped me move a long way down that road! So, feeling brave, I tried the glaze on my newly painted cream chalk paint (homemade) French Provincial nightstands. Oh, I'm not too happy with the result. BLAH! Looks dirty and uneven in the cracks, not pretty like yours.I have decided to redo tonight using a pretty turquoise. Will let you know how they turnout. BTW, your settee turned out just beautiful!!! Sara1122

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    Replies
    1. I mostly use chalk paint followed by clear wax then glaze and seal with polycrylic. I don't seal with wax because it does need to be reapplied every 6 months or so.

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