Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Annie Sloan Chalk Paint Tutorial

After I posted the wax video tutorial a couple of months ago, I received tons of questions about applying chalk paint.  You know what that means...a new video tutorial!  I don't know about y'all but I'm a visual learner.  If I can watch you do something then I have it down...if I read the steps, I tend to have too many follow-up questions.  {cindy.must.have.pictures.or.videos.to.diy}  Please keep in mind that a) I'm no expert but I do have experience messing things up and then trying to make them pretty and b) I'm not a natural in front of a video camera {or iPad in this case}.  Enjoy!



 Please feel free to comment with any questions and I'll do my very best to answer them {or at least tell you that I have no idea}.  Oh, and here's a peek at how the tables in the video turned out...
 
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20 comments:

  1. I love love love you AND this tutorial!!

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    1. How sweet are you?!? Thanks for reading, watching, and taking the time to comment!

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  2. Great video, I found it very helpful. I have been using ASCP for about a year, but little instruction. I am finding more and more out about it as everyone shares their tutorials.

    I had a question about the distressing. I had done a few projects before I learned that you should wax before distressing, but I found that I still had the same issue, regardless. When I sand off certain spots, not only does the paint come off, which is what I want, but it also leaves that particular spot, much more smooth and almost shiny. Is that how it should be. If that even made sense...I wish I could send you a picture of what I am talking about...it may make more sense by doing so.

    Regardless...I am looking forward to your next tutorials, especially if you do one on the actual distressing...that may give me a better understanding of the process.

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    1. Terri, have you tried switching to a coarser grit sandpaper? Maybe a 150 grit with a lighter hand might chip the paint instead of smoothing it. I do notice, particularly with colors other than white, that the paint where I sanded becomes a shade lighter. This will disappear with a light second coat of wax. Hope that helps! Thanks for reading!

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  3. Terri, thanks again for such a great tutorial. Your the best. Blessings Paula

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  4. Hi Cindy. I just watched your youtube video on ASCP and wanted to say THANK YOU!! I have been terrifed of starting my project (and was even going to pay $100 for a class) but after watching your video, I am going to just go for it. Your tutorial is the best out there so thank you, thank you, thank you! Oh and I hope the one above uses the dark wax (getting ready to watch it). Of course, I decide to use 2 different colors and both waxes on my first ASCP project. Go big or go home right?! Take care and thank you again!
    ~rayna

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    1. Just.do.it! Honestly, this is just one of those jump-in-feet-first kinds of things. Also be conservative to start...you can always add more paint, more distressing and more wax if you need it! Send me a picture when you're finished. Love to get those. Clear wax tutorial is live on the blog (and youtube) and dark wax should be live today or tomorrow. Thanks for watching and reading!

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  5. Thanks for the great tutorial. I think you are great in front of the camera. :) This weekend I'm attempting to paint a set of dining chars and I appreciate your guidance. The one thing that I'm confused about is that everywhere I read it says how far the quart of paint will go but I've gone through the entire can and still don't have the full coverage that I'm looking for. I think you even said in your video that you did a table and six chairs. I did just six chairs. They were unfinished. Do you think that makes a difference?

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    1. In my experience, it absolutely makes a difference when you are painting unfinished wood. It will soak up a lot more paint (including latex). Also, I tend to thin my second coat by adding a small amount of water. It still gives great coverage but makes your paint go further. Another factor can be detailing on the chairs. For me, chairs often use more paint {and time} than chests due to so many surfaces and details.

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  6. Anonymous1/16/2013

    Great tutorial! I am wondering... If I don't want to make my piece too distressed, can I just use clear wax? And also I see that you are painting inside? Do you always do? How strong is ASCP odor-wise? It is winter where I live and our garage is not insulated. Wondering if I can paint inside?

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    1. Susan DuBose1/19/2013

      There is no smell at all to the paint. ZERO odor. I paint in my breakfast room and then we have dinner while furniture is drying. The wax definitely has an odor and I do that with some ventilation

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    2. I second what Susan said! :) Also, you do not have to distress but you always have to seal the paint with wax or another sealer.

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  7. Crystee1/20/2013

    Thank you so much for the reply. I see some ray of hope here.

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  8. Anonymous2/17/2013

    Your tutorials are great! I had a quick question for you. I think you mentioned it somewhere but I can't find it now. When distressing, should you do that before or after a coat of clear wax? Or does it matter?

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    1. You can do either. Annie Sloan says to wax then distress but I do both.

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  9. Do you sand between the first and second coat of paint? I'm doing my first project a dining room table and chairs. I've got coat one on most of it. Also, my project has leather on the wood... I'm painting over it. Have you got experience there and do you think it will stick well? Thanks!

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  10. Alison7/30/2013

    Thank you so much! I am a kindergarten teacher who desperately needs some real wooden bookcases for the classroom, so I recently bought some wooden pieces that need painting from a local thrift store. While visiting my sister-in-law recently, she told me about Annie Sloan's Chalk Paint. I bought some and will be trying it out tomorrow. Thanks to your tutorial, I feel more confident now on how to go about this project. Thanks again! :)

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  11. Thanks for the tutorial. I'm getting ready to paint my kitchen cabinets in Annie Sloan Country Grey with a dark wax overlay. My question is do I need to use the clear wax first and then the dark wax? This is what I was told by the lady where I bought the paint. She told me to use the clear wax, then the dark wax and then clear wax again. In your opinion is this what I should do? I've never painted with ASCP before. Thanks!
    Dawn

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    1. Clear followed by dark and that's it. Clear acts as an eraser for the dark so if you apply it over the dark then it will take off all your hard work! You do have to add clear first or the dark will not be workable and will stain the paint.

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  12. What a great and informative video. We're a stockist of ASCP in the UK and we love your video and blog post :)

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