Sunday, July 22, 2012

Annie Sloan Wax Tutorial

I have returned from an impromptu break for the summer {Hey, that's what happens when you are the working mom of 2 little ones as I'm sure many of you can relate}!  I have received a lot of questions about how to apply Annie Sloan Soft Wax using a wax brush.  I didn't want to just tell you about it but SHOW you how to apply it so I thought this would be a great opportunity for my first video tutorial.  {Please ignore the umms and avoidance of eye contact.  Talking to an iPad is quite awkwardOh, and I hope you like my very technical terms like smear and globs!}  Enjoy and feel free to post any questions you may have!




One thing that I failed to mention is the durability of wax finishes.  I feel like a lot people might assume that the wax finish doesn't cure as hard as, let's say, polyurethane.  Not true.  My dining table in our breakfast nook was sealed with paste wax.  We eat family dinners at this table every night {and I have a 2 & 4 year old so durability is a must}.  To clean, I use Greenworks multipurpose spray but any non-amonia, non-bleach multipurpose cleaner will do.  I would recommend applying at least 3 coats of wax and reapplying a coat yearly, or more often if you notice rings.  Now, glasses will leave a ring on the table BUT it goes away within 20 minutes or so after removing the glass so no worries. 

Now, in the video I showed you my new can of wax.  Here is how much wax I have after applying 1 coat to the chest in the video PLUS 4 dining chairs, a coffee table, a dining table, and 2 side tables.  Most important thing to remember...a little goes a long way. 


What is your favorite product to seal painted pieces?

PS...I have a feeling Annie Sloan would cringe if she heard me compare the consistency of her wax to Crisco.  It's the best way this southern girl knew to describe it {and I swear it looks just like Crisco}.

Updated: View the video tutorial on applying chalk paint here.

90 comments:

  1. Hi Cindy. I just found your blog. I was searching Youtube to find some instruction on applying Annie Sloan clear wax when I found your video. I have to say it is the best instruction video I have seen yet for applying the wax. I was really frustrated as I just completed my first small piece and was having trouble with the wax. Thank you so much for showing just how much wax to use and how to apply it. As you said most people do, I applied too much wax. At least now I know how to correct it and what not to do next time. I was scrolling through your blog and found your drawer liner tutorial. Think I will try that next. Thanks again for all your clear and expert help.

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    1. So glad you found it helpful! The wax definitely has a learning curve but you will get more comfortable. You should try the drawer liners...SO easy and adds tons of character to a piece.

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  2. Hello! Thank you so much for this tutorial! I am new to using Annie Sloan chalk paint and the soft wax. I fell in love with the paint...the wax was not so easy at first :-) I knew I was not using it correctly,and confirmed that when I found your tutorial. I too applied too much wax. Thank you again for showing the correct way to apply the wax. You saved my newly painted dressers and my investment in my Annie Sloan products. My hubby thanks you too!

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    1. Like I said in the video...everyone seems to use too much the first time, including me! Be sure to let me know if you are having any other issues or you have other tutorial suggestions. I'm not an expert but I have become very comfortable with the paint and waxes.

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  3. Yes - thank you for this tutorial! I wish I knew all your great tips before I started - because I had the too-much-wax problem too.

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  4. when I am using the chalk paint and clear wax, I find some of the colour comes off and I want a smoother one colour look. Is there something I can do so the wax won't take off the colour?

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    1. This is how chalk paint naturally reacts with the wax. When you apply the wax, the color will deepen and thin out a bit. I've even had the wax brush distress the paint on hard edges. I would definitely apply 2 coats of paint but you will likely still experience this. I paint full strength on the first coat and mix a very small amount of water to the paint to thin it out for my second coat. Chalk paint is designed to look hand painted and will deliver a finish with dimension. If you are looking for a smoother finish without much dimension then I would recommend using latex or oil-based paint. Chalk paint is an amazing paint, and definitely my preference, BUT I still use latex when I want a smoother, even finish. By the way, you can still seal latex with wax!

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    2. Also, if you wait and let the paint dry overnight, you'll notice less of it coming off when waxing.

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    3. Anonymous1/28/2014

      Annie also makes a brush so the chalk paint goes on smooth. The type of brush you use also makes a difference on the texture which will have effects on the wax as well.

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  5. Wow. That was awesome! I have been "saving up" to buy some paint, wax, and the brush and this is the BEST tutorial I have found (I want to be prepared when I finally have some to play with!). One of the hardest parts about painting is that it always takes less on the brush than you think it does, no matter what kind of paint you use. Thanks! I am pinning this for future reference!

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    1. Thank you Shanda! I'm hoping to do a video tutorial on applying and troubleshooting chalk paint soon.

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  6. Thanks for all the information on the AS wax. I used the chalk paint for the first time this week and loved the results, but I used MinWax my piece. I'm saving up for the clear wax and some authentic brushes. When using the dark wax, do you use a separate brush (dedicated to dark wax only)or can you use the same brush for both waxes?

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    1. I use the same brush but I don't use dark wax very often. If you plan to use dark wax on at least half of your pieces then 2 brushes would be helpful. You do have to clean your brush thoroughly and let it dry overnight before using the brush to apply clear wax on a new piece. Otherwise, the dark wax will transfer some onto your new piece.

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  7. Just hopped over from MMS and I'm happy to be your newest follower! What a sweet blog you have! I am a firm believer in AS Wax. I use it for all my furniture pieces!!! Would love to have you stop by for a visit! Blessings ~ Judy @ www.vintagestreetdesigns.com

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    1. LOVE your graphite transfer chippy table. How creative!

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  8. I am soooo glad to find this tutorial. I am about to purchase some ASCP for several projects. If you sell it, I would happily purchase it from you. I am so glad you stressed about NOT using a lot of wax because I probably would have. I'm still up in the air about purchasing old white or pure white. I'm going to paint the woodwork in my home white and my walls will be a very soft wheat color. I have a hutch to paint and dining chairs and mirrors and trying to decide if the old white will look to dirty against my white woodwork. Do you have any input to share? I just "liked" you on facebook so I can keep up with you. Thanks for taking the time to share info. I know it isn't easy finding time working full time and being a mom. ♥

    ~ Lisa ~

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    1. Thank you for the feedback! I WISH I was a stockist but I am not so check out Annie Sloan's website for a list. Now, color...honestly, I prefer Old White over Pure White when it comes to furniture. Pure White is great for mixing but it literally has no color or depth to it whatsoever. It is just personal preference. The Old White doesn't look dirty against stark white trim as long as you stay away from the dark wax. It just looks authentically aged!

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  9. I just want to tell you, that your video was the absolutely best! I like the way you measured out the wax on a paper plate, took off extra wax on said paper plate, and applied, with specific directions. (those corners first).
    I watched your video last night, then when I was in bed, could have kicked myself for not saving your site. Thank goodness I found you again. This time I'll save, and follow you on Facebook and google. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your technique with us. Blessings Paula Lusk

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  10. Thanks so much for this tute very easy to understand. When I finally buy some chalk paint I won't have to fear waxing it!

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  11. Wow...excellent tutorial! Thank you sooooo much. I too am getting more and more comfortable with the ASCP and wax. I really appreciate you providing this info. I just found your blog and I'm so glad I did!

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  12. Anonymous8/01/2012

    Your tutorial is awesome - thank you so much! I purchased my first 3 cans of ASCP on Saturday and one each of the clear and dark wax. Have painted my hutch Duck Egg Blue (LOVE) and a mirror frame in Old White (love) . . . guess what? I did the wax wrong, just like you said! Was so happy to find your tutorial here and am going to write down your site so I never lose it! Can't wait to see your tutorial on the dark wax - keep 'em coming! Judi V

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    1. Great Judi! You can always follow me via Facebook, Twitter, Reader or email by clicking the icons in the upper right hand corner. That way you never miss a post!

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  13. This is the best tutorial You have cleared up a lot of things for me - especially the brush care part. I was afraid I wasn't using enough wax but now I see that I have been using too much. My next piece is going to look a lot better thanks to you.

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  14. I have been sitting on the fence on whether or not to down the chalkpaint road. I think you have convinced me that I need to get moving on this. Thanks so much for posting this tutorial... you answered every question I had in my mind about the wax... you did an awesome job on this. I am one of your newest followers to date and can't wait to have a good look around.

    Hugs,
    Deb

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  15. Hello! Thank you so much for this tutorial! you have shown the correct way to apply the wax. That was awesome! Your all tips and techniques are well described.
    Remove Water Marks

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  16. Hi there...came across your blog while searching annie sloan chalk paint. I am highly considering purchasing some chalk paint for the first time. I've been searching online to see what the durability is?? I am looking to paint dining chairs (that do not have cushions), white. Does anyone know how well the paint will hold up? I'm looking for a distressed look anyway, but here's my concern--I keep reading how easy it is to achieve this "distressed" look, and I'm wondering if daily use of the chairs will cause the paint to come off. Any insight would be appreciated!!! Thanks!

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    1. No worries, Wendy! Chalk Paint is very durable once it is sealed properly and has cured. (By the way, it also has a shorter cure time than latex, which can take up to 30 days to fully cure.) When I say easily it distresses, I am talking about BEFORE multiple coats of wax are applied. I usually apply a minimum of 2 coats of wax but you can always apply 3, just to be sure. Hope that helps!

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  17. Great post. I am hosting a Giveaway to win a 50 dollar gift card to the store HomeGoods. It would be great if you stopped by and entered. Thanks Anu

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  18. I have been searching for common sense directions on best application process for AS wax and you nailed it hands down. Good Job and THANK YOU!! I did my first wax application following your method and it turned out marvelous!

    Can I ask where you got your wax brush? It doesn't look like the AS Ultimate Wax Brushes that I have seen. I would like to get ahold of a nice big one like the one you use in your tutorial. Thanks in advance. Cari Few

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    1. You are so welcome! I actually purchased the wax brush from my Annie Sloan stockist. They are available in a short or long handle. I prefer short handle to get into tight spaces!

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  19. Just found your site..........love it. My questions about wax.....I thought I was putting it on very light, but when buffing it off the finish looks streaky. Like a satin shine here and a dull surface next to it. Also I didn't think you could apply in circles. Thought you had to apply it with the grain? Are you getting a sheen uniformly over your entire surface? Just wondering if that is what I am suppose to be going for.

    PS I hope you find this comment!!

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    1. Always apply wax to painted pieces in a circular motion and the same goes for buffing. The AS wax can appear uneven on your first coat. I always apply at least 2 thin coats, letting it cure overnight in between applications. This should help with the streaky appearance. Wax is very different from other top coat options. Remember...it will never look 100% even like a poly, which is why wax is so great at giving hand painted pieces character!

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    2. I am so thankful for these comments and answers. I get so frustrated with the streakiness. I feel like I am probably using a little too much, but am having a lot of trouble working it into the paint. I have tried different brushes, motions and amounts. I'm ready to go get a wax brush to see if that alleviates my problems. Seeing your video helps me know that I'm working hard enough, but something is still off.

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    3. The wax brush made all the difference in my finish. It distributes the wax evenly and really pushes it into the paint. The other important step to prevent streakiness is to buff after apply the wax to remove excess wax. Then buff after 24 hours, if needed, to remove tackiness and get the sheen you prefer..

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    4. Anonymous11/11/2012

      Hi, GREAT tutorial, I am having trouble as well with uneven look on my pieces after waxing. I thought it was the brush but just bought an AS wax brush and still have an uneven look. My biggest problem seems to be when I apply the wax it only darkens where I first touch the brush to the piece, it deepens there and a few circles worth around that spot then stops deepening (I see in your video exactly where you hit the brush to the piece and it covers a lot) this seems to be where my uneven look is from. I am so frustrated, I've invested in paint, waxes, brushes and have 5 pieces painted and unwaxed as I can't get it right....what am I doing wrong?? :(
      Wendy

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    5. Wendy--My advice to you would be to contact the stockist you purchased it from and see if they can give you additional tips. They should be trained on techniques and troubleshooting. Are you noticing this on all colors or one in particular? Are you buffing immediatley after you apply the wax to the entire piece? I also feel over the entire section with my hand to make sure I didn't miss a spot as I go. When I reload my brush I make sure to blend it really well into the area I already waxed so that I don't get those heavy/light/heavy effects.

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  20. Anonymous10/09/2012

    The comment above is the first one I've seen about the wax not giving an even look. I've read so many blogs about using too much wax that I think maybe I didn't use enough. There are darker areas and lighter areas on my piece and it looks kind of blotchy. Do you have any ideas why it would look that way? I'm letting it dry overnight and will try a second coat tomorrow hoping it will look better. I really like your suggestion about rubbing the brush on the plate to get the excess off and evenly distibute the wax on the brush before applying. I think that will really help. You were right on about prepping the brushes by soaking in water to get out stray bristles. The AS information sheet given to me when I bought the AS brush just said to hit it against your hand and a hard surface a couple of times and then dip in wax or paint and make a big X on newspaper to get the strays out. This did not work and I got quite a few brush bristles stuck on the paint/wax and they were really a pain to get off. Thanks so much for your tutorial. It really helped to actually see someone do it right.

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    1. Having the exact same issues...not sure why, following every single direction here still getting uneven colour. Not streaks, uneven tones. See my remarks directly above.
      :(
      Wendy

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  21. Anonymous11/01/2012

    I have had the same issue with the wax having the "streaky" look and it can be so frustrating! I am waxing with just a very small amount of wax so I wondered if I was doing the opposite and not putting enough! I will try a second coat and see if that helps. My question tho is, is there another way to seal/protect the paint other than the wax? I LOVE the chalky flat appearance and when I wax it gives my piece a sheen. On deeper colors I love the wax but on old white I hate it! It seems to turn yellow and shiny. Am I doing something wrong or is this just how its going to look? Do I have another option? I've looked at others furniture that has been painted with AS and they dont seem to have this shiny coat...help!

    Kelly

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    1. Hi Kelly! I completely understand the frustration. The steps that made the most difference in my finish were using the wax brush and buffing after you after apply the wax to remove excess wax. Then rebuff after 24 hours, if needed, to remove tackiness and get the sheen you prefer. No more streakiness for me. Alternatives to wax are polyurethane (will yellow your whites so only use on color) or polycrylic. These are available in different sheens. I prefer the look of waxed furniture because I think it gives the most professional looking finish. If you don’t want a shiny sheen then don’t buff as much. Only buff after your initial application and don’t rebuff the next day. Hope that helps!

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  22. Hi Cindy! I just had to drop you a quick note to let you know that I found your video tutorial about AS Wax to be so great and helpful! Previously frustrated with other furniture pastes and ploys, I turned to the all-hailed Annie Sloane wax. I was all excited for it to arrive and when it did (with the brush), I didn't even know where to begin. Your tip about soaking/prepping the brush AND seeing your technique helped me take on my dresser project with confidence. I am THRILLED with the result (nice hard finish - no tackiness!) - we're putting the hardware back on and bringing it in the house today! Thanks again for such a great video :)

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    1. So great Megan! Glad you found it helpful. :)

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  23. This has helped me tremendously!!! Thank you so much for posting. I just got my first can of AS clear wax and my hubby surprised me with the brush, I can't wait to get started.

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  24. You make it look SO easy!! I have one coat of wax on top of Graphite ASCP, definitely think I'll have to buff and put on second coat of wax tomorrow. I got the splotchy look others have mentioned.

    I've wiped off brush, worked into paint to the best of my 35.5 week pregnant self can muster!!

    Practice makes perfect! Thanks for your tutorial!!

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  25. I, too, have suffered the blotchiness problem... unfortunately on a table top that sits in a breakfast nook surrounded by windows, so the light amplifies it. I am so sad!

    I painted the table Coco, distressed with Graphite, repainted twice due to wax issues, and just applied a fork/knife/spoon stencil, followed with yet another fresh waxing. Because I have put so much time and energy into this table, and the stencil was no easy feat, I think I'll just wait it out and see if time (and cleaning) either evens the finish out or contributes more to its character. Interestingly, the legs of the table, which I did exactly the same, are perfect and look professionally finished.

    Very frustrating! So glad to read these posts, though, and know that I"m not the only one in this boat. Hoping the next pieces take the wax more uniformly...

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  26. Anonymous12/02/2012

    I appreciate your tutorial greatly as I've been having many of the same issues with the wax as others have talked about here. I have a question about the consistency of the wax in the can. I have only used part of one can of the clear wax and it seems like it is thicker than it should be for me to get a thin coat. I have been keeping the wax in the house so the colder temperatures outside won't affect it, but that isn't helping. I do have one wax brush that I've used with the dark wax, but don't really like the dark wax as much as the clear. I've used the dark on a few small pieces. I will use your cleaning tip to get it ready for the clear wax and then the paper plate technique (which makes so much sense to me!) and then try again. I just finished two coats of country gray on my bathroom cabinets and don't want a streaky, uneven finish. I bought some dark knobs to use and am doing the bathroom first before trying to paint and wax all of my kitchen cabinets. Any ideas about the wax consistency? Is there any way to thin it? Thank you so much for your time to share your ideas here. Cheri in California

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    1. Cheri--I don't know about thinning the wax but you may consider sealing with a wipe-on poly instead of wax for your bathroom cabinets. It is easy to work with and will leave a rock hard, even finish. You can use polyurethane for colors but be sure to use polycrylic over whites because polyurethane will yellow white over time.

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  27. Cindy -- I love your tutorials! Absolutely wonderful.

    I am currently painting a dresser with Old White Annie Sloan and just applied my Soft Wax tonight. I used cheesecloth to apply my wax, and might I add - NEVER AGAIN, but my wax seems streaky. Will this go away over night or will I need to do another layer of wax with the waxing brush to even it out?

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    1. Candice- I find that the streakiness does subside as the wax cures. It typically takes a couple of weeks on most of my pieces. I have also found that I don't have the streakiness issue when I apply the wax using a brush.

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  28. Hi Cindy, I'm a Yankee and still appreciated your "Crisco" comparison to the soft wax. I think it helped me visualize the waxing tutorial. I am preparing to paint my first piece of furniture. I have been reading a lot about the clear and dark waxes. I came across a mention that color could be added to the clear wax as an alternative to the dark wax. Have you tried that? I have a childhood image in my mind of a piece of my mother's furniture and I believe I can recreate it by adding color to the wax.

    I enjoyed your tutorial and think it is the best I have seen regarding the application of the wax and the choice of the Annie Sloan brush.

    Thanks,
    Patti-Ann Tanis

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    1. Patti-Ann--I have heard that you can tint the clear wax with any of the ASCP colors but I haven't tried it. Maybe a new project on the horizon!

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  29. Wow Cindy...I just found you via Savy Southern Style...and I am so glad I did! Your tutorials are awesome and the best!!! Thank you for sharing what works best for you...very, very helpful! I am convinced I dod need AS brush for her wax.

    Thanks so much!

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    1. Thanks Jan! You will be amazed at the difference in your finish when you apply with the wax brush.

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  30. Anonymous2/02/2013

    Hi Cindy,

    Thanks for sharing your tips and advice on ASCP and wax. I'm new to this and tried my first project tonight - let's just say I used too much wax! I can't wait to start another one though thanks to your helpful tips!!

    Kelsey

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    1. kelsey,
      Did you fix the over wax problem? How did you correct it?

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  31. Great tutorial! I'm another one with the blothly/uneven wax issue. :( I'm so bummed but I'm determined to figure this thing out! :) Thanks for your great tips!

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    1. Don't get discouraged! Keep trying and you will get the hang of it soon enough!

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  32. Anonymous3/05/2013

    You did it! You helped me conquer The Wax Monster!!! Thank you sooooo much. I've been painting with chalk paint (Annie Sloan's as well as homemade) for a few months now, and I was just having an awful time with the wax. Now I realize I was putting on WAY too much. I watched your tutorial a few weeks ago. Then a few days ago I tried your method on a piece I had just painted -- and voila! No blotchiness. No arm almost falling off because of insane amount of buffing out gloppy, sticky wax! I had watched other tutorials, but yours is the best by far. I can't thank you enough. I was almost ready to give up on this whole wax craze. But now I look forward to doing many, many more pieces. THANK YOU! Julie

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    1. Julie, this made my day! I love that you conquered the wax monster. Once you have mastered it then it's a breeze, right? Glad I could help!

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  33. Thanks so much for this video! I put way too much wax on (my first time). I didn't know how to fix it and your video tutorial was very helpful. It was also nice to see exactly how much wax is enough and to see how to apply it instead of just reading it. Hopefully after a couple of days and a ton of buffing, my desk will look nice.

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  34. I'm another person with streaky/blotchy problems. It seems to happen with large areas only, smaller areas are okay (no streaking). I've done some furniture pieces and I'm currently working on my kitchen cabinets. I painted two coats of Duck Egg Blue and 2 coats of wax. Large areas (cabinet fronts & backs) are streaky and I am not happy with the way it looks. I'm going to let it cure for a while and keep re-buffing to see if it evens out. If not, I will re-paint (third coat) and use polyurethane on top to achieve an even finish. Any ideas?

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  35. Jessica4/02/2013

    Just as an added hint about the 'scary' dark wax.... You can mix some clear wax into the dark wax to help it glide on smoother, make it easier to work with (I feel like the dark wax is not 'creamy' enough without blending a bit). I just mix it in a little glass jar and keep it lidded 'til it's gone. If you want to use pure dark wax, try waxing with CLEAR first, THEN put the dark on after. You'll find it gets stuck in the crevices less and is easier to manage the effect.

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    1. Thanks Jessica! I actually recommend the same method of mixing the dark and clear waxes in the dark wax tutorial. Great minds think alike! :)

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  36. I could kiss you [but you are thousands of miles away ,I am in England !] This is soooo much better than even A.S. 's own tutorial. i love using the chalk paint but was getting ready to throw the whole lot into the garden because I just couldn't get on with the wax at all [it always looks patchy especially on dark colours I ended up using water based varnish on some drawers I had painted in Emperor's Silk ]I have also been using an AS paint brush because the shop was out of stock of the wax brushes but I am making it my mission to track down a wax brush before I even go near another pot of wax. Thank you so much [am off to watch the dark wax tutorial now !]

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    1. Thanks Dottie! Let me know how your project turns out!

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  37. Courtney5/31/2013

    I'm so happy to find your wax tutorial. I did not purchase the wax brush (b/c I wanted to keep my cost down--I'm painting a 40$ craigslist table and chairs I already own). I'm really bummed I didn't purchase it-but may head out tomorrow to get one. Have you used Graphite? I painted one ladder back chair in graphite and the clear wax (applied w/ cheesecloth) left a white'ish residue and I'm not pleased. Do you know what I did wrong? thanks! -cd

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  38. Hi Cindy,
    I am getting really frustrated with my dining table:)

    I have painted it in Annie Sloan grey and waxed it. The finish is still soft though. The paint scratches really easily. As if it has not cured yet. It has been over a week.

    I don't know whether to add a new coat of wax or wait some more.

    The difficult part is that it is a dining table and we need it everyday. So putting it away to cure is a bit tricky.

    I would appreciate your help.

    Many thanks.

    H

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    1. Anonymous7/09/2013

      I am having the same issue with dining room chairs I painted and waxed over 4 months ago. My son has scratched off paint in areas. Is there any way to touch up spots or do i need to start all over? Also, is it possible to poly over the wax, since I like the effect of the dark wax?

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  39. Donna Faulkner6/28/2013

    Hi, Cindy. My husband totally sanded a dining room table down to raw wood. Could I use the Annie Sloan now? Or, should we put some primer or something on it first? I enjoyed this video and am about to put the wax on the 6 Barcelona Orange chairs I painted yesterday (my first project).

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  40. Anonymous7/09/2013

    Hi Cindy,
    I am having issues with dining room chairs I painted and waxed over 4 months ago. My son has scratched off paint in areas. Is there any way to touch up spots or do i need to start all over? Also, is it possible to poly over the wax, since I like the effect of the dark wax?

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  41. Anonymous7/10/2013

    Cindy, I took an ASCP class and the instructor advised using no odor mineral spirits to thin the wax. As you mentioned, it's easy to overdo the wax when learning and I did exactly that on my first two pieces. I've since gone back (months later) and applied a very small amount of the mineral spirits then buffed it out. Worked like a charm.

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  42. I loved the tutorial. It helped a lot. I just need that brush now. :) One question though....when I put the wax on a table I did I can still see the circles where I put it on. I rubbed off the excess then later buffed it but the circles are still there. They look awful when the light hits them. I even went back and put the wax on in a straight line but they are still there. Help! Would the brush have made a difference for this?

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  43. Great tutorial thanks. I find that if I wax the piece before distressing, there is less sanding dust.

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  44. Anonymous7/18/2013

    Can you use this wax on unfinished wood? I have a Restoration Hardware reclaimed wood table. Would this be a good product to seal the wood?? Thanks!

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  45. Anonymous7/20/2013

    I have tried this wax again and agian it is dry and drags badly . I try and put on this coats and that makes it worse sticking ..it does not really stay wet enough to wipe away any excess ?

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    1. Maybe try a different brand. There are many on the market...Johnsons, Minwax, CeCe Caldwell, etc.

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  46. I Am in hawaii and having a hard time finding wax. no luck at home depot, lowes, or walmart. i even called a speciality craft store and no luck. any other suggestions?

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  47. Anonymous7/31/2013

    Hi there,

    I would like to mix some of my chalk paint with the soft clear wax. Do you have any advice on doing this (I've read that it can be done, but no one seems to say HOW to do it)?

    Thanks!

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    1. I have tried it and just didn't like the look it gave me. I spooned out a couple of tablespoons of wax onto a paper plate and add paint a few drops at a time until the tint looked right.

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  48. Waxing was so stressful. I must have started out using to much wax on first drawer. Now buffing and buffing four days later I am not liking tey way one drawer looks. Do I paint over it? Sand it a little and paint over it? Help anyone. Glad I tried small nightstand first before hitting big dresser

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  49. Anonymous9/19/2013

    I am not able to find the brush you are using. I'm being told that the flat wax brushes are not by Annie Sloan. Please help
    Debbie

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  50. Anonymous9/21/2013

    I have used the ASCP on a bunch of pieces and I too, have been guilty of too much wax application. I waited about a month to see if the top of a console table would ever cure. It did not, so I used some mineral spirits to thin it out and got rid of the tackiness. Luckily, it only took the wax off and did not effect the chalk paint. Also, wanted to tell you, I tried an interesting treatment on a different piece after seeing it in one of Annie Sloan's books...I painted the whole dresser in Old Ochre and then the top with another coat in Graphite, before the Graphite dried I took a rag with a good amount of clear wax on it and rubbed back and forth onto the wet paint - crazy I know!! Well, let me tell you...it came out gorgeous! it looks like old slate or granite, but not in a faux finish way. The base coat of Old Ochre comes through and the wax is more subtle. I have several of her most recent books and they have great suggestions in them.
    Cora

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  51. So I have had success on using Annie Sloan clear wax, but the table I did with the dark wax, did not turn out as well. It even is flaking off with using the table. Do you have a suggestion on how to redo the top of the table? can I just sand it and start over?

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  52. Anonymous1/10/2014

    Great tutorial! I have done a few small pieces with ASCP and and used her wax, but not her brush. I had such a hard time getting a small amount of wax on. Such a waste to wipe off tons of wax when it is so pricey! Will definitely get a good brush and try your method next time!

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  53. Hi Cindy, where did you say you can buy the AS wax brush from? I can't find that short fat handled one that is circular anywhere. Thank you
    Angelique

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  54. Hola Cindy, es la primera vez que uso la pintura y la cera de Annie Sloan, y estaba un poco perdida. había utilizado la cera oscura y creo que he utilizado mucha y me ha quedado FATAL. No entiendo inglés pero solo viéndote creo que me has enseñado como darla. Muchas gracias por tu blog, me encanta.

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  55. Anonymous3/11/2014

    Hello- Thank you for your tutorial on "how to wax". I recently painted my dining room table and four spindle chairs with Annie Sloans "Graphite" chalk paint. I realized in the process of waxing the chairs that I was using way too much product. Now I have sticky chairs with messy white wax. What would you recommend is the best way to fix the situation?

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  56. Anonymous3/23/2014

    Could you help me understand how to get a good finish with the Annie Sloan clear wax over Graphite...I never get a good even finished look.

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  57. Anonymous4/08/2014

    I found your tutorials on chalk painting and clear wax application very helpful and informative. However, I would like to see you do a more indepth tutorial on distressing large flat surfaces such as flat surface areas of dressers, table surfaces, etc. This would be most helpful to me in the future. Thank you.

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